Burbage Valley

The most popular short walks near the Fox House inn visit the Burbage Valley. The Burbage valley is a sweeping curved valley in the Dark Peak. The misfit stream of Burbage Brook flows the length of the valley. At the southern end, the Brook flows under the A6187 then through the delightful Padley Gorge. A little extra interest is added to this atmospheric location by a patch of forestry plus some natural areas of woodland associated with the two climbing crags. The path through the forested area is very pleasant indeed.

Climbing

The eastern boundary is marked by the crags of Burbage North (marked Burbage Rocks on the OS map) and Burbage south. There are many short and easy graded climbs on the Burbage north crag therefore it is often populated by beginners groups. Large numbers of big blocks at the foot of the crags thus attracting the bouldering community. You find several Peak District classic climbs here, for example, Banana Finger, Knight's Move and Long Tall Sally. Burbage south crag has a fierce reputation, in my experience, well earned! There are a lot of very difficult routes here.

Higgar Tor

The western boundary of the Burbage Valley is marked by 2 tors, at the north lies Higgar (sometimes spelt Higger) Tor, popular with tourists and Sunday strollers. Take a short walk from the road along an easy path to get a real feeling of the wild high Peak District Moorlands.  The views from the top of Higgar Tor are impressive, it feels like you can see the whole of the Peak District.

Carl Wark Hillfort

South of Higgar Tor lies Carl Wark. There is a hill fort of unknown age, possibly Iron Age, encircling the summit. One face of the remaining walls appears to have been vitrified using fire.

The Fox House Inn

The Inn was originally part of the Longshaw estate and probably dates back to 1773. It was apparently first called 'The Traveller's Rest' but at some point, it was renamed after a local landowner, George Fox who lived at Callow. It was built alongside the coaching road linking Buxton and Sheffield, part of this still exists and joins the Sheffield - Hathersage road near the Fox House. On the map, it is named Houndkirk Road.

In the 1840s the Duke of Rutland ordered an extension to be built, thus greatly enlarging the accommodation.

The Fox House currently serves food, 5 real ales and has nine guest rooms. The car park is roomy but often used by visitors to the Burbage Valley and surrounding moorland rather than pub patrons. Winter visitors can expect to be warmed by welcoming log fires and there is a beer garden for summer visits.

The Fox House Walks

Image: short walks near the Fox House - Burbage Valley.

Disclaimer - these walks are only described in broad detail. If you decide to follow any of the Peak District walks from this site, please make sure that you have fully planned the route and that your party has the necessary skills, equipment and fitness before setting off into the hills.

First of the short walks near the Fox House Pub

From the Fox House Pub car park, take the path going downhill from the outdoor seating area. A little way before it meets the Sheffield to Hathersage road, there is an access point to the open countryside. Go through and take the path across the moors. Follow it along the top of Burbage South crag, past the deep quarries (care as they are unfenced).

Eventually you will come to the break between Burbage South crag and Burbage North Crag. At a crossing of paths, take the left one that drops you onto the main valley path (a wide track). Follow that back to the Hathersage road and return to the Fox House alongside the road. If you want to avoid the road section, you can find a number of paths leading off to the left after the quarries. Some of these return you to the open country access point near the Fox House. There isn't an obvious way through so it may require a bit of trial and error.

This is a route that needs small children to be fully under control so that they don't drop off the cliff edge or get run over on the road section. The same goes for your dog, it should be on a lead at all times as sheep graze here.

Second of the short walks near the Fox House Pub

Take the footpath from the Longshaws Car Park that passes behind the buildings and follow it to the road Junction. Carefully cross the road (busy at times) and take the bridleway (a track at this point) through the gate. After a while it becomes more of a path through a plantation (but still a bridleway). Follow it through a second plantation and join the A625 close to the Grouse Inn. You can either walk back up the road to re-join the track through Longshaws or retrace your steps. You get good views over Derbyshire, Froggatt and White Edge.

Third of the short walks near the Fox House Pub

From the Fox House Pub, take the path going downhill from the outdoor seating area. Just before it meets the Sheffield to Hathersage road, there is an access point. Take the path across the moors and follow it along the top of Burbage South crag. Go past the deep quarries (care as they are unfenced) and continue to the break between Burbage South crag and Burbage North Crag.

At the crossing of paths, take the right hand path uphill and follow that until you meet a track. Turn right along the track (beware - off road motorcyclists and 4x4 drivers like to use it to enjoy the peace and quiet of the countryside) and return to the Fox House.

This is a route that needs small children to be fully under control so that they don't drop off the cliff edge or get run over on the trackand short road  section. The same goes for your dog, which should be on a lead at all times anyway because sheep graze here.

Fourth of the short walks near the Fox House pub.

From the Longshaw Estate car park, walk down to join the estate entry road. Follow that to the end and cross the B6521. Follow the path through the woods. This brings you to Burbage Brook at the point where it flows under the A6187 Sheffield-Hathersage road. Cross the main road at the bridge.

Take the path (Toad's Mouth) that leads upwards into the open country on the Hathersage side of the bridge. Follow it all the way to Carl Wark. When you have had a good poke round at Carl Wark, drop down the north side. Here you will find the path that takes you down to the little bridge that crosses Burbage Brook by the plantation.

You can follow Burbage Brook back to the A6187, but bear in mind that you need to be on the right bank when you get back to the road. Cross the road and retrace your steps back to the parking. As with the other walks, sprogs and dogs need to be well under control as there is plenty of opportunity to get squashed by vehicles or fall off things.

Fifth of the short walks near the Fox House pub

Start as for the fourth short walk but instead of crossing the A6187 go left (steep slippery descent in times of poor weather) before the bridge. Trundle down Padley Gorge, alongside the delightful Burbage Brook, and back.

Kids, dogs, control blah-de-blah ...